PORSCHE 911 AIR COOLED ENGINE REBUILD

The engine in the below picture's was painted black to the request of the customer 

WHAT WE DO WHEN REBUILDING ALL PORSCHE 911 AIR COOLED 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, 3.6 REBUILT ENGINES :-

Our Porsche engine rebuilds include new piston rings, crankshaft main bearings, con rod big end bearings, new gaskets, seals, chains, tensioners and all guides we also fit new oil return tubes and all new studs/bolts. 
The engine is stripped to bare components and put into a high pressure cylindrical wash at high temperature with cleansing chemicals, 
this removes all carbon deposits and debris from previous failures. From this stage the cylinder barrels are pistons are checked and rings are changed, connecting rods  and the crankshaft is then checked and polished.
After this the main and big end bearing shells are replaced, the oil pump reconditioned.
Cylinder Heads are stripped down and checked for wear, cracks and for trueness. 
Valve guides are then checked for wear and replaced as necessary. 
Refaced valves are re cut & the head then leak tested. The Camshafts are then checked for wear and replaced as necessary. 

Some may need new heat exchange plates this would be at an extra cost.

ALL PORSCHE 911 AIR COOLED 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, 3.6 REBUILT ENGINES WITH 1 YEAR WARRANTY 

(Engine only) from

£3995.00 + VAT 

ALL PORSCHE 911 AIR COOLED 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, 3.6 REBUILT ENGINES WITH 2 YEARS PARTS AND LABOUR WARRANTY

(supply & fit) from

£4995.00 + VAT

1964: The 911 enters production with a 2.0-liter, air-cooled SOHC flat-six making 148 horsepower.

1967: Porsche added the sportier 911S to the range with a modified 2.0-liter making 180 hp. A higher compression ratio, as well as changes to spark and cam timing and the carburettors, contribute to the added power.

1968: The 911S is pulled from the U.S. market thanks to stricter emissions standards; the base model is rechristened 911L and gets no engine changes.

1969: Porsche brings back the 911S, now with an emissions-compliant fuel-injection setup shared with the mid-level 911E. All 911 engines switch from aluminium blocks to magnesium, and power rises to 125 hp on the 911T, 158 hp on the 911E, and 190 hp on the 911S. The 911T continues to use Weber carburettors.

1970: The new 2.2-liter flat-six is dropped into the 911T, 911E, and 911S; the block is again magnesium and the basic aluminium head design is shared across the range. Output rises to 142 hp in the 911T, 175 hp in the 911E, and 200 hp in the 911S.

1972: North American emissions requirements again force change, this time to a lower compression ratio; Porsche ups the flat-six’s displacement to 2.4 liters to make up for the lost power. All 911s are now fuel-injected, netting the 911T 157 hp. Output in the 911E goes to 185 hp, while the 911S delivers 210 hp.

1973: Porsche introduces the Carrera RS 2.7, a homologation special that isn’t officially imported to the U.S. It utilizes a racing-spec 2.7-liter flat-six, but as a result of horsepower ratings switching from SAE gross to SAE net, the RS officially makes 200 hp. 

1974: All 911s get the RS 2.7’s 2.7-liter flat-six with K-Jetronic fuel injection, and the 911T and 911E model designations make way for 911, 911S, and Carrera. Output inches up from its emissions-choked backpedal in 1973, but even with more displacement, the 911 makes just 143 hp. The 911S and Carrera pack a 167 hp

1975: More emissions restrictions push output ratings down further, and the base 911 goes on hiatus. The 911S and Carrera produce a meagre 157 horsepower in California the horsepower figure is even lower.

1976: Enthusiasts welcome the Turbo to the 911 family. A KKK turbocharger fitted to the 2.7-liter flat-six boosts output to a great 234 hp, a huge improvement over the 911S’s carry-over engine. The hand throttle between the 911’s front seats (essentially an idle-speed adjuster to ease cold starting) disappears. It is rendered obsolete by the fuel-injection system’s new vacuum-operated warm-up regulator.

 

1978: A new, aluminium-block 3.0-liter flat-six replaces the 2.7-liter magnesium-cased unit. The 911SC—equivalent to the previous year’s 911S—makes 180 hp. Thanks to an air-to-air intercooler, the Turbo moves further up the power ladder, producing an huge 265 hp;

1980: The emissions rules catch back up to Porsche, necessitating the Turbo take a break from the U.S. market. The 911SC continues unchanged, but with the 3.0-liter now uniform across the U.S., there are no differences between the California car and those sold elsewhere. Output lowers to ’78 California car levels: 172 hp.

1983: Nothing about the 911SC’s 3.0-liter six changes—and the Turbo is still MIA in the U.S.—but now the SC’s engine can be paired with a convertible body style.

1984: The 911SC designation gives way to Carrera with the introduction of a new 3.2-liter flat-six. Still a SOHC engine, the 3.2-liter switches from Bosch’s K-Jetronic fuel injection to the more modern Motronic system. Horsepower rises from 172 hp to a grand 200 hp,

1986: The Turbo returns! This time, it’s powered by a 282-hp, 3.3-liter flat-six. The Turbo’s signature widow-making, boost-dependent dollop of mid-range torque checks in at 278 lb-ft.

1987: Changes to the 911 Carrera’s Bosch fuel-injection system bumps the 3.2-liter’s output to 217 hp and 195. This necessitates the switch from the 911’s long-running five-speed manual to a stronger Getrag unit.

 

1989–90: The C4 911 debuts with a much bigger engine, a 3.6-liter flat-six that’s still all-aluminium. Predictably, power rises. The base Carrera 2 now makes 247 hp. The new 4 wheel drive Carrera 4 is slightly heavier, but its 3.6-liter engine is identical to the rear-drive 911’s.

1991: The Turbo returns in the new C4 body style, but keeps the old 3.3-liter. A larger turbocharger and intercooler push output to 315 hp.

1992: A limited-production Turbo S, dubbed S2 here in America, benefits from a revised fuel-injection computer. This gives it an advantage of 7 hp over the regular Turbo.

1994: Porsche swaps the Turbo’s old 3.3-liter six with a new 3.6-liter unit, keeping the turbo and intercooler from the outgoing car. Output ges up by a huge 40 horsepower.

1995: The 3.6-liter flat-six gets hydraulic valve lifters and lighter internals, gaining an extra 23 hp. There is no Turbo for 1995, but it would soon return.

1996: A new variable-geometry intake dubbed Varioram boosts output to 282 hp. The Turbo is reintroduced in the 993 body style, with twin turbochargers and dual intercoolers mounted to the 3.6-liter six. Porsche reigns in the Turbo’s 400 hp with standard all-wheel drive.

1997: The Turbo is re-joined by a limited-edition Turbo S, which adds on an additional 24 hp thanks to increased turbo boost pressure.

All engines and gearboxes sold by Dal Jones Automotive are on exchange basis of serviceable units and surcharges may apply.

   Any work undertaken and not completed will be charged at our hourly labour rate £85+VAT.

Porsche History 

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